Journey into Art – A Silent Art Auction to benefit Trekkers, Wednesday, July 25

 

  • In a setting overlooking the ocean, join us for an evening of art inspired by and benefiting Trekkers
  • Featuring 26 local artists
  • Hors d’oeuvres, cash bar
  • Location: Steel House South, 639 Main Street, Rockland (across from Home Kitchen Cafe)
  • Open to the Public – free admission, 6-8pm

 

PARKING:

Parking will be available along Main Street; the public parking area next to Wasses Hot Dogs; and Home Kitchen Cafe (we have received permission from the owners).  Please do NOT park in any areas that are marked Private Parking.

 

“JOURNEY” is a theme dear to the Trekkers mission. An integral aspect of Trekkers is the journey that students take with us over six years, with our caring mentors helping them to grow into resilient, thriving, responsible adults that have acquired the skills they need to identify and realize their aspirations.

Twenty-six Artists are donating artwork to our event and sharing how the theme of “journey” inspired their submissions.

Our past two art auctions were very successful and we are so grateful for the generosity of all artists that have participated. We are proud to tell you that the donated artwork from our previous fundraiser resulted in over $28,000 in revenue, which provides expeditionary learning opportunities for 15 students for one year.

All the money raised at this Silent Art Auction will support our continuing efforts and mission as a long-term program that connects young people with caring mentors and leverages out-of-classroom learning to help students grow into resilient, thriving, responsible people. With guided support from adult mentors and deeply committed volunteers, Trekkers students work hard, have fun, form life-long relationships, expand their world-views, take supported risks, build resiliency, and acquire the skills they need to identify and realize their aspirations.

FMI: Shari Closter, 207-594-5095, shari@trekkers.org

 

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS

 

 

SHERRY BARKER ABALDO & KATHLEEN A. FOX

Value: $20

Poet Sherry Abaldo lives and writes on a pond in Union, Maine, where she grew up. She has written scripts for award-winning documentaries and Hollywood features and her poems have been published in prestigious journals such as Rattle, The Ekphrastic Review, Northern New England Review, and elsewhere. Artist Kathleen Fox lives and paints in Port Clyde and Tenants Harbor, Maine. She has received several awards for her art work and children’s books and is the creator of a calendar of paintings of lobster boats which has been a staple in Midcoast Maine for the past 10 years.

BODY SONGS is a book of poetry and art that includes several recent creations using the ekphrastic approach to art. The poetry is written by Sherry Barker Abaldo, and the paintings are by Kathleen A. Fox. The combination of the two forms is a creation of both the artist and the poet.

Kathleen and Sherry met in 2015 and began an ekphrastic collaboration of poetry and art which has continued over the past few years. The word “Ekphrasis” means responding to one artwork by creating another artwork in a different medium. “Childhood Dogs” takes ekphrasis one step further, by melding images and words completely together, inviting the viewer to participate in creating a unique experience. This is, for us, a new journey in the area of creativity which we hope will catch on. Although ODE TO A GRECIAN URN was an early example of ekphrasis and the initiative has a history from the time of ancient Greece, our total combination of two art forms, with the poem an integral part of the painting, rather than next-to the painting, is a new form of ekphrasis. This has been a journey for us which has happened over about a three-year period of collaboration. Much like the journey that Trekkers students embark on, this journey had unexpected twists and turns, finally culminating in a merging of our two art forms. This was an unexpected turn, but very much to our liking. We know that Trekkers gives the same experience to the students – they go into the journey out of interest, and because they want to, but do not know until it is finished how valuable, fun, and uplifting it will ultimately be. Also, in order to reach this point in our collaboration, we had to get our egos out of the way, with neither of us taking full credit for the creation. Both our names will be on the final ekphrastic creation (“Childhood Dogs”) and the poetry book will include the work of both of us. This is, in an individualistic society such as ours, a major step. Trekkers also takes students out of their comfort zone, focused largely on themselves, into a collaborative mode of sharing which is not based on ego.

 

JOSEF ALBERS

“Full”, 1962. From “Homage to the Square: Ten Works by Josef Albers”. Edition of 250.  Image 11″ x 11″. Value: $1500

Josef Albers (1888-1976) was a German born artist, teacher, writer, color theorist and painter who was a leading pioneer of twentieth-century modernism. Albers taught elementary school and then art before enrolling in the newly established Bauhaus in 1920. The Bauhaus emphasized the connection between artists, architects, and craftspeople and his earliest works tended toward industrial design including stained glass windows, furniture as well as photographic collages.  Albers and his wife, artist Anni Albers, arrived in the U.S. in 1930 through an invitation to join the faculty at Black Mountain College in North Carolina and began developing his printmaking techniques. They moved to Connecticut in 1950 where he became the chair of the Department of Design at the Yale University School of Art. In 1971, he was the first living artist ever to be honored with a solo retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

The print being auctioned to benefit Trekkers was donated by The Josef & Anni Albers Foundation and is from the series Homage to the Square for which Josef Albers is best known.  From 1950 until Albers death in 1976, he produced hundreds of variations on the basic compositional scheme of three or four squares set inside each other, with the squares slightly gravitating towards the bottom edge. What may at first appear to be a very narrow conceptual framework reveals itself as one of extraordinary perceptual complexity. In 1965, he wrote of the series: ‘They all are of different palettes, and, therefore, so to speak, of different climates. Choice of the colors used, as well as their order, is aimed at an interaction – influencing and changing each other forth and back. Thus, character and feeling alter from painting to painting without any additional ‘hand writing’ or, so-called, texture. Though the underlying symmetrical and quasi-concentric order of squares remains the same in all paintings – in proportion and placement – these same squares group or single themselves, connect and separate in many different ways.’

 

ANGELA ANDERSON

“Snowy Tracks in the Landscape”. 11 1/2″ x 18″ Oil on Panel.  Value: $500

Angela is a Rockland native with a BFA in Painting from UNH Durham.  Her Post Graduate work was done at Empire State College in New York.  She is an Art Model for Philip Pearlstein and a collaborator with Martin Kippenberger.  Returning to Maine, Angela worked at the Lincoln Street Center in Rockland for five years. A Full time painter and artist, she teaches painting one day a week.  She lives in Port Clyde and is married to a lobster fisherman.  Her winters are spent painting in Bonita Springs, Florida.

Inspired by the title of your project “journey”, this piece was spontaneously conceived of while working on another project; and just the journey of making art in the studio, not knowing what will be the next idea to spark. Traveling by train has an old-fashioned feel…European, romantic. Most of my train travel has been solo, and a time of reflection and creativity.

 

ANNIE BAILEY

 

“UpLifted”.  Value: $1800

Annie Bailey is a visual artist from Tenants Harbor, Maine. Described as “hovering’ between abstraction and impressionistic realism”, her work celebrates the range of one’s creative potential, from control to chaos. She earned her BFA at the Rhode Island School of Design in 2010. Her work has been exhibited at the Farnsworth Art Museum, the Caldbeck Gallery, the National Geographic channel and the Rockland Shorts International Short Film Series.

This painting was inspired by a moment when two women showed up in support of a challenge I had undertaken. It was made as an expression of gratitude for those that lift us up during challenges we undertake as individuals — as Trekkers did for me many times during my journey from adolescence to adulthood.

 

 

 

 

KIM BERNARD

“Currents”. Encaustic, lead. 12″ x 12″. Value: $1200

 

Kim Bernard creates kinetic sculpture, installations and works in encaustic. She received her BFA from Parsons and her MFA from Mass Art. Bernard teaches at MECA, Plymouth State University and offers workshops throughout New England. She also organizes the Rockland Sculpture Race to be held this year on August 11.

I’ve been working on a series of encaustic pieces lately that all include meandering lines that flow in a non-linear manner. There’s much movement, peaks and valleys, ups and downs, sometimes coming full circle, but always moving and progressing, like the journey of life.

 

 

 

 

 

GEOFF BLADON

“Lobsters in Lincolnville”. Value: $450

Geoff began painting as a child in Montreal, Quebec and hasn’t stopped since. His work in Maine has been influenced by Connie Hayes and Colin Page. His paintings may be seen at Tidemark Gallery in Waldoboro and River Arts in Damariscotta.

I went to Lincolnville to paint the ferry dock, which I thought would be consistent with the theme. It was a grey, cloudy, raw day. Then, I saw the cheerful candy cane colors of McLaughlin’s Lobster Shack, which said “PAINT ME!”.  I did.

 

 

 

 

 

DAVID BLANCHARD

“Land Legs”.  Linoleum woodcut-style print of a hiker. Framed size:  12″ wide x 13 1/2″ high. Museum quality presentation with acid free paper, non-reflective glass, custom matting and custom wooden frame. Value: $300.

My wife, Paula and I moved to Maine in 1989 and have lived at 87 Pearl Street in Camden ever since. Paula held “regular” jobs while giving me the opportunity to engage in a continuous exploration of jobs and avocations too numerous to list. So, my “long-and-winding-road” illustrates well the theme of “a journey”.  I “discovered” art in 2010, when at age 60, I was inspired by oil painting in classes taught by Ron Frontin at the Lincoln Street Center. Since then, I have experimented with many mediums and methods. Paula and I are now retired, giving us both time to indulge in art making and appreciatiion, landscape design, and gardening. In addition to working in my shop/studio and gardens, I have for the past five years been managing a life drawing group that meets regularly in Camden. I am also a nature lover. When the U.S. first observed Earth Day in the spring of 1970, I was a sophomore in college and about to choose an academic major. I became one of Williams College’s “instant ecologists,” graduating with a BA in the new field known as “Environmental Studies.”  After earning an MS in Environmental Education, I worked in mid- and upper-level management positions at the Nature Conservancy, the Massachusetts Audubon Society, and The New England Wild Flower Society.  And I consider myself a Mainer; my roots run deep in the Midcoast. Though I was born and raised in suburban Long Island, New York, my farming and seafaring ancestors settle in Woolwich circa 1750, and my siblings still enjoy summer cottages in Searsport that have been in the family for 98 years.  Although I have no direct association with Trekkers, I appreciate what it does for young people and am pleased to support the organization that supports them.

This 7″ x 9″ block print on paper is an artist’s proof. It will be larger when matted and framed. The image is inspired by a print in the book Voyaging: Southward from the Strait of Magellan by Rockwell Kent (G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1924). Kent – an adventurer, author, and illustrator – was certainly a trekker at heart and in deed. This piece is meant to be a rustic, folk-art style evocation of a challenging journey. The trailside monument symbolizes the guidance that Trekkers provides to journeyers along their many paths.

 

ELIZABETH KATE BRAESTRUP

“For the First Time” – 1. Value: one-of-a-kind

I grew up abroad, in various locales, but have been in Maine for 33 years. My “day job” is to serve as chaplain to the Maine Warden Service. I am also a New York Times bestselling author and – recently – a painter of pictures.

I spend so much time on the road, or in wild places, that home has become even more important to me. When my body must be elsewhere, my mind goes home to rest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELIZABETH KATE BRAESTRUP

“For the First Time” – 2. Value: one-of-a-kind

I grew up abroad, in various locales, but have been in Maine for 33 years. My “day job” is to serve as chaplain to the Maine Warden Service. I am also a New York Times bestselling author and – recently – a painter of pictures.

I spend so much time on the road, or in wild places, that home has become even more important to me. When my body must be elsewhere, my mind goes home to rest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAM CADY

“Pemaquid Point with bell buoy, calm day – For Trekkers in memory of Jenifer Mumford”. Pen & ink drawing. Value: $300

Sam Cady has exhibited and taught art around the country and in Japan, but especially in Maine, Boston and New York for 45 years.

Thinking of Jenifer Mumford inspired this work. Pemaquid Point points towards the ocean and beyond with its accompanying adventures, the bell buoy is our guide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULIE CRANE

“Artic Strands”, varied edition monoprint. 18″ x 22″. Framed size: 26″ x 31″.  Year: 2017. Value: $1200

Having been a grateful recipient from the Gifted and Talented program at the Camden/Rockport High School, I  went on to receive a BFA from the Maine College of Art. The next ten years were spent in Santa Fe, working for ceramic artists and studying printmaking. Upon returning to my homeland, I have continued with printmaking, sculpture and encaustic.

Story about my artwork: While picking chanterelles on a wooded mountainside in Mora, Sweden, a large hare came out from amongst the mossy mounds. The sun was sending rays of light at the late day angle through the tall pines. With grand listening ears and powerful hind legs, this creature shared a glimpse of calm routine maneuvering along a path through a landscape rich with beauty.

How the theme “journey” inspired my submission: On a hike one winter through the Thomaston forest I came upon the most majestic of ice displays. There were caves with stalactites and a series of archways all arranged with frosty sparkles and patterns of drips set in descending arrays. I wondered what it would be like to witness an arctic hare in this scenario. The DNA strands that appear in this monoprint are representing a concept about our life choices. We are wired to seek.

 

KATHLEEN A. FOX & SHERRY BARKER ABALDO

“Childhood Dogs”, a new ekphrastic creation, 24″ x 33″ canvas archival pigment printed signed by the artist and the poet.

“Childhood Dogs”, a new ekphrastic creation, 24″ x 33″ canvas archival pigment printed signed by the artist and the poet. Value: $800

Artist Kathleen Fox lives and paints in Port Clyde and Tenants Harbor, Maine. She has received several awards for her art work and children’s books and is the creator of a calendar of paintings of lobster boats which has been a staple in Midcoast Maine for the past 10 years. Poet Sherry Abaldo lives and writes on a pond in Union, Maine, where she grew up. She has written scripts for award-winning documentaries and Hollywood features and her poems have been published in prestigious journals such as Rattle, The Ekphrastic Review, Northern New England Review, and elsewhere.

Kathleen and Sherry met in 2015 and began an ekphrastic collaboration of poetry and art which has continued over the past few years. The word “Ekphrasis” means responding to one artwork by creating another artwork in a different medium.  “Childhood Dogs” takes ekphrasis one step further, by melding images and words completely together, inviting the viewer to participate in creating a unique experience.

We are excited to debut this new approach to ekphrasis at Trekkers. This is, for us, a new journey in the area of creativity which we hope will catch on. Although ODE TO A GRECIAN URN was an early example of ekphrasis and the initiative has a history from the time of ancient Greece, our total combination of two art forms, with the poem an integral part of the painting, rather than next-to the painting, is a new form of ekphrasis. This has been a journey for us which has happened over about a three-year period of collaboration. Much like the journey that Trekkers students embark on, this journey had unexpected twists and turns, finally culminating in a merging of our two art forms. This was an unexpected turn, but very much to our liking. We know that Trekkers gives the same experience to the students – they go into the journey out of interest, and because they want to, but do not know until it is finished how valuable, fun, and uplifting it will ultimately be. Also, in order to reach this point in our collaboration, we had to get our egos out of the way, with neither of us taking full credit for the creation. Both our names will be on the final ekphrastic creation (“Childhood Dogs”) and the poetry book will include the work of both of us. This is, in an individualistic society such as ours, a major step. Trekkers also takes students out of their comfort zone, focused largely on themselves, into a collaborative mode of sharing which is not based on ego.

 

RONALD FRONTIN and ROBERT BIRD

“Light Keepers Daughter”.   Signed and numbered (181 of 600). Donated by Ronald Frontin and the artist’s dealer, Robert Bird.  Value: $1200

Ronald Frontin is a contemporary Maine painter who continues the American realist tradition of Winslow Homer and Thomas Eakins with his fastidiously rendered figural images set on the coast and in the countryside. His subjects include the hardworking fisherman and farmers of Maine and his family and friends.  Frontin was born in Camden, Maine, in 1962 and today resides near the town of Rockland. Indeed, he only lived out of his home state briefly, while attending the Philadelphia College of Art (1981-85) and while apprenticing in Andalusia, Pennsylvania, with the noted realist painter Nelson Shanks (1985-88). Frontin’s outdoor scenes portray the hardy individuals who make their living from the fields, rivers, beaches and bays of Maine. The artist, who himself enjoys working in the open air, is interested in painting people who are physically engaged with nature and who are unaware that they are being studied; the opposite of posed works, these images convey respect for the grueling and absorbing tasks of outdoor life and capture the particular light and mood of the Maine landscape.With their poetic undertones and personal subject matter, Frontin’s paintings have an affinity with those of Andrew Wyeth. Soundly crafted and thoughtfully composed, Frontin’s works reveal his desire not to impose his own point of view on a subject, but rather to derive inspiration directly from it, allowing its intrinsic nature to emerge.

 

 

ERIC HOPKINS

 

“On the Road – 3-21-88/10-18-17″.  Watercolor and crayon. 22″ x 15”.  Framed size:  20″ x 26″ (framing donated by Primrose Framing). Value: $3000

With the eyes of an artist, the words of a poet, and the mind of a scientist, Eric Hopkins has engaged numerous people through his art and with his thoughts about life on this Big Blue Planet.  He captures the dynamic forces and rhythms of nature in watercolors, oils, blown glass, mixed media, and photography. His vision focuses on the Big Picture of the natural world, geological and geographical forms, and the exchange of energy between Earth, Water, and Sky. From this intimate study of nature, Eric has developed a keen awareness of light, form, color, and pattern, which is reflected in all of his work.

Eric is a graduate of Rhode Island School of Design and has taught at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and Pilchuck Glass School. He has exhibited at the Farnsworth Art Museum, Portland Museum of Art, Center for Maine Contemporary Art, Waterfall Arts Center, University of Maine Museum of Art, and a number of galleries nationally. Eric’s paintings and glass are held in many private and public collections, including the Farnsworth Art Museum, Portland Museum of Art, Bates College Museum of Art, University of Southern Maine, Corning Museum of Glass, Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, and the U.S. Department of State Art in Embassies: Bahamas, Mali, Pakistan, Philippines, and the West Indies. He is also represented in the corporate collections of Central Maine Power, L.L. Bean, Johnson Wax, Sanyo Securities, TD Bank, and Idexx Laboratories.

 

ANN HRITZ

“UP is DOWN, DOWN is UP”.  Value: one-of-a-kind

I live on the rocky coast of Midcoast Maine. My surroundings are an important part of my life. I hope my work reflects this relationship. I love rocks.

Rocks tell a story of the earth’s journey through time.

 

LYDIA KAEYER

“The Aqua VW”.  Watercolor. Value: $400

Born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, BA Wheaton College, Special ED Teacher in Westchester County, New York (retired). Watercolor artist since 2000. Homes in Owls Head, Maine and Lakewood Ranch, Florida. Exhibits at Port Clyde Art Gallery. Signature Member of Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society.

This VW painting is similar to my first car! It starts my journey traveling through Europe when I was first married! It will always bring back wonderful memories. Someone who owns this car looks like they will have a lot of fun too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONICA KELLY

“Beginning with a Wish”.  8″ x 8″, Oil on Panel.  Value: $750

Monica Kelly was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1956 and earned a B.A in Visual Arts and Art History from Bowdoin College in 1978. After teaching studio art in private schools for a few years, she enrolled in graduate studies in painting at the Cleveland Institute of Art in Lacoste, France. After several years living and working in New York and San Francisco, Monica returned to Maine in 1989. She has exhibited her paintings in galleries in Ohio, New Jersey, South Carolina, France, and most broadly, in Maine. In addition to her work as a painter, Monica serves as Executive Director of Bay Chamber Concerts and Music School in Rockport.

The painting refers to the journey that we take by engaging with art, literature and the creative process. This image, of a young girl reading and ‘growing wings’, suggests that through books, we are invited to take flight from our world and into that of the writer’s and of our own imagination.

 

 

OTTY MERRILL

“Their Long Journey Home”.  Framed, high quality Giclee Print (printed by Warner Graphics in Camden on archival paper with archival inks). Value: $1100

Otty Merrill has been living and making art in the Tenants Harbor and Portland area for the past three or four decades.  She works out of her waterfront studio in Turkey Cove and at Running with Scissors Art, a cooperative of 55 professional artists in Portland.  She is a member of NEW ENGLAND WAX, a select membership group of the best artists working in encaustic wax in the Northeast, and she is a member of International Encaustic Artists.   Her work has been exhibited widely over the years. From The Atlantic Gallery in Chelsea, NYC. to the University of Maine in Augusta and Belfast.  Locally, she has shown at Asymmetric in Rockland and will be having a solo show at THE GRANITE GALLERY in Tenants Harbor this July/August. Her work has been included at The Portland Gallery/Art Collector Maine on Exchange Street in Portland. Otty graduated from Endicott College, Beverly Mass, where she studied art and worked in an advertising agency in Rockefeller Center.  After marrying and moving to New England, she co-founded The Sherborn Arts Center, in Sherborn, Mass.  She raised a family, ran a pottery business and was a licensed real estate broker owning her own company in Amherst, New Hampshire.  She and her husband have recently made Tenants Harbor their permanent address after spending summers here for 45 years.  “My subject matter most often involves images and memories of a small girl growing up in a Polish community in New Jersey…that would be me!    I often use old photographs as source material.  I have been fortunate to travel to Europe many times, always come back inspired, so my subject matter may reflect that. The encaustic process suits me perfectly.  It’s quick, forgiving, spontaneous and intriguing.  It allows for all kinds of surprises and unplanned possibilities.”

This work was in progress already, when I got the invitation to submit.  The title just jumped out at me, and seems so appropriate to the theme.  I often use imagery of a little girl in a white dress and often include an older woman, as people who follow my work know.  Guess it’s imprinted in my consciousness and it’s a subject/theme I can’t seem to exhaust.  My hope is that the title causes the viewer to imagine and interpret on their own.

 

GREG MORT

“The Tranquil Sea”, Limited Edition Giclée Print, Artist Proof. 29″ x 24″ with Archival Framing. Value: $2000

Greg Mort is a widely recognized American contemporary artist whose unmistakably modern creations have the classic feel of the Dutch Masters juxtaposed with startlingly modern designs. His signature images combine his twin passions for science and nature.

Mort’s artwork is in many prominent collections including the Smithsonian, National Gallery of Art, Boston Museum of Science, Delaware Art Museum, Farnsworth Museum, Academy Art Museum, Portland Museum of Art, Brandywine River Museum and the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum.  The United States Department of State’s Art in Embassies program has selected many of his paintings for their cultural diplomacy efforts including an ongoing exhibition at The White House.  Mort’s artwork has been exhibited in over one hundred museum and gallery shows around the world. Recent museum shows include “Lunar Attractions” at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA and “Starry Skies of Art” at the Serlachius Museum in Mänttä, Finland.  Currently Mort’s paintings are featured at The American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore Maryland.

Deeply fascinated with astronomy and the universe Mort’s life-long interest in science is frequently reflected in his artwork. He has been a commissioned NASA artist since 1983 and serves on the board of the Lowell Observatory.  In 2010 his painting “ZERO-G Apples” was one of six paintings juried into “The First Art Show in Space@” aboard the International Space Station.  A skilled astro-photographer and telescope builder Mort is a sought after speaker on the intersection of art and science.

Throughout his career Mort has recognized the power of imagery and used his art to share his passion of promoting environmental awareness.  In 2007 he established The Art of Stewardship Project, his family foundation that supports and inspires ecological consciousness through the arts.  The Art of Stewardship Project works with arts and educational organizations to build partnerships and collaborations reinforcing the artist’s role in preserving our fragile Earth.  Leading by example Mort is a Clinton Global Initiative Partner offering his artwork to support the goals of Circle of Blue the international organization of top journalists and scientists providing relevant, reliable, and actionable on-the-ground information about the world’s water and food resource crises. CircleofBlue.org   

Mort is a self taught artist, passionate amateur astronomer and enthusiastic competitive archer.  During the winter he lives and paints in rural Montgomery County Maryland and in summer on the rugged Maine coast in the fishing village of Port Clyde. GregMortCollection.

 

JON MORT

“Music of the Spheres”, Limited Edition Giclée Print, Artist Proof.  20″ x 18″ with Archival Framing. Value: $400

Millennial artist Jon Mort has received broad acclaim for his startlingly realistic colored pencil and large-scale graphite images and is also a highly sought-after portrait artist. Captivated by design and drawing since childhood Jon received Fine Art and Classics degrees from Franklin and Marshall College and his Masters in Architecture from the Rhode Island School of Design

Jon’s creations have been shown in exhibitions at the Phillips Museum, the Portsmouth Museum of Art and recently in a one-person exhibition titled LIVING LEGENDS at the Sandy Spring Museum in Maryland. He has participated in twenty one-person or group museum and gallery exhibitions. His 2017-18 winter show NEW HORIZONS at Somerville Manning Gallery is featured in November 2017 American Art Collector Magazine.

Jon is currently a highlighted artist in SCALE at the Carla Massoni Gallery. He is represented worldwide by the Somerville Manning Gallery, (SomervilleManning.com) and Carla Massoni Gallery, (MassoniArt.com) He lives and maintains studios in Washington, DC and Port Clyde, Maine. JonMortStudio.com

 

CHRIS MOSES

“Village Path”. Value: $275  

I have been painting since childhood along the Maine coast. I used to carry watercolors to various sites and now it is oils. Plein Air painting gets me out into the salt air, sunshine, breezes and inspires me to try and capture the feeling of the coast.

Going to Monhegan to paint in the summer is an annual event. This trip I enjoyed seeing those who love to “journey” on the trails there. This inspired my painting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JORDAN KENDALL PARKS

“Through The Wire”, Woodcut on rice paper.  Value: $600

Creative expression for me is ever-changing, yet fluid. The marks in my woodcuts are synonymous to the turns I make on my surf and snowboards, in the ocean or mountains; a reaction to my environment, a conversation with my materials. Currently based in Portland, Maine, my lifestyle invigorates my artwork and challenges it to adapt. Driven by the discoveries that unfold along the journey to the completed print, I remain extremely process oriented. Whether carving away a chunk of tree with an ax or burying prints beneath the high tide line, the explorations, detours and unexpected alterations that occur have taught me to revel in the resilience of my materials.

“Through The Wire” is a conversation about transitioning between familiar and unfamiliar habitats. Told through various journeys of a wolf, this print is the final in a series of four that narrates the ominous emotions of navigating new environments, relationships and interactions we experience.

 

 

GEORGE PEARLMAN

“Corn Copter”. Acrylic on a 9″ x 10″ canvas. Value: $500

George Pearlman has shown his work internationally and has been the recipient of numerous grants, residencies, and teaching positions throughout the USA and abroad. He is known for his one-of-a-kind ceramics and his gallery, George Pearlman Pottery, in St. George, Maine. He is also known for his paintings, which have been exhibited in Canada and the USA. George has been a full-time artist for 35 years and lives in Maine year-round.

Corn Copter is about outrage and amazement on an imaginary journey by air. Acrylic on a 9″ x 10″ canvas creates an intimate portrait of intrigue.

 

 

SARAH RAWSON FRIS

“A Trekkers Journey”.  Value: One-of-a-Kind.  11″ x 14″ original with archival quality framing. 

Sarah grew up with her two sisters in Beverly, Massachusetts, but the rocky shores of Hupper Island, where they spent their summers, always felt more like home. Perhaps it was the pea soup fog rolling in on quiet mornings, or the porpoise puns that were pondered while paddling the St. George with her sisters that drew her to the whimsical world of story telling and ink and watercolor illustration.

I was inspired to go a little out of my comfort zone with this piece in an attempt to convey the impact that Trekkers has on the students who choose to take part in the 6 year journey. My sister, Hannah, has been a Program Manager for Trekkers for four years now, and I have had the privilege to witness firsthand how the program positively influences her life and the decisions she makes as an adult. Though I am older by birth, she has taught me how to live life with courage, strength, grit and grace… along with a healthy dose of laughter.

This piece not only pays homage to my sister, but to all the wonderful people who make it their purpose to strengthen, empower and encourage these students. These experiences will forever shape the hearts and minds of everyone involved for the rest of their lives.

 

 

 

 

BJÖRN  RUNQUIST

“Going Trekking”.  Value: $500 

(Photography courtesy of Photographer Alan LaVallee)

Björn Runquist was born in Stockholm, Sweden, grew up in New York and spent his high school years in France before returning to the U.S. for college.  He has spent many summers in Maine and is now a full time resident.  He has work in the permanent collection of the Farnsworth Museum and has exhibited widely in galleries on the East Coast from Florida to Maine, including the Caldbeck in Rockland, the Connecticut Biennial at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, The Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockport, and the Allan Stone Gallery in New York.  He was featured in Maine Home & Design in April 2010, in August 2010 and again in January 2018.. He is also listed as one of Maine’s 60 artists “to collect now, while you can”.

In March 2018, I visited the Houston Museum of Science and saw an exhibition from Chad Pregracke’s Living Lands Waters Foundation, a massive, long term clean-up effort on the Mississippi river.  He was struck by the number of bottles he found over the years with messages in them.  The exhibition was entitled “Message in a Bottle”.  Some of these bottles had traveled hundreds of miles.  I was drawn to this idea and the idea of the classic “ship in a bottle”  that has been part of seagoing communities for years.  What about a bottle that was itself the ship, with a message in it?  So I started playing with this idea, thinking of Trekkers and the voyages they will take, the messages they will carry.  I started at the recycling station to get a bottle and then recycled material until i was done.  All the wood is drift wood, the masts, booms and bow sprit are my old paint brushes, the map, evoking their trip around the world and back home, older and wiser, is from a 1975 atlas.  The message in the bottle is a Sanskrit proverb urging us to seize the day. The sea glass in the bottle I have gathered over the years. This is glass that has “traveled” as well and shows the marks of its journey. The final ship/bottle is a whimsical, ship/wagon ready for travel through the imagination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRETA VAN CAMPEN

“View from Little Cranberry Island”. Acrylic on panel. 14″ x 14″. Value: $1650

I’m an artist from Thomaston, Maine known mostly for my hard edge, geometric landscape paintings. When I’m not at home in my studio, you can find me exploring and gathering inspiration from the land, water, roads, houses, sky, people, and animals nearby.

I love to travel, but some of my favorite journeys have been to places right here on the coast of Maine. I am constantly inspired and surprised by the beauty of our coast. My idea of a perfect journey is to leave early in the morning, drive to a peninsula or take a boat to an island, spend the day exploring, photographing, and painting, and then drive back through the sunset and darkness to sleep in my own bed.